3 reasons an eagle watching cruises is the perfect family activity

Every year, hundreds of bald eagles return to Lake Coeur d’Alene during their annual migration. During December and January, these majestic creatures gather at the north end of the lake to feed on lake-bound salmon. It’s nearly impossible to miss seeing these birds — they’re everywhere! For about eight weeks, the eagles are hunting, nesting and soaring around the area, and we have a cruise that takes you to the best places to see eagles.

With our daily Eagle Watching Cruises, you can get an up close with the country’s bird. Here are three reasons why an Eagle Watching Cruise is the perfect activity this holiday season.

  1. Great activity for family
    During the holiday season, many Coeur d’Alene residents have family visiting. Instead of sitting around the house, join us on the water for an Eagle Watching Cruise! The two-hour cruise is a great opportunity to see the beauty of North Idaho from a unique perspective, and cruises are exciting for people of all ages.
  2. Learning experience for kids
    During the Eagle Watching Cruises, our crews will talk about why the eagles are here, what they feed on and more about their importance to North Idaho. This is a great opportunity for kids to keep learning, even while they’re out of school on winter break!
Also during this time of year, we offer specialty charter rates for schools who want to take students out to learn about the local ecosystem first hand! Contact us today for more information.
  3. Get some fresh air!
    It’s easy to stay inside during the chillier winter months, but take this opportunity to get outside and enjoy the beauty of Lake Coeur d’Alene. The cabins of our cruise boats are heated and our galley serves lots of tasty treats, so you can pop inside and warm up periodically throughout the trip.

Are you ready to join us on the water for one of the most spectacular wildlife viewing excursions in the Northwest? Contact us to schedule your cruise!

How the magic happens: Bringing the North Pole to Coeur d’Alene

Getting Santa, Mrs. Claus and all the elves from the North Pole to Lake Coeur d’Alene for our Holiday Light Cruises can be tricky, logistically. After all, it is the busiest time of the year for Santa Claus, as he and the elves make toys for all the good girls and boys of the world.

So instead of asking Santa to take time out of his busy schedule, we bring children to the North Pole for a quick meet-and-greet with the Head Elf himself.

There’s a lot of behind-the-scenes magic that goes into the annual Journey to the North Pole Cruises. Each year, the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre uses its influence with Mr. Claus to bring the North Pole to life. We sat down with the summer theatre’s artistic director Jadd Davis for a couple quick questions about how the winter magic happens.

Question: How long has CST been involved in the Journey to the North Pole cruises?
Jadd Davis: The Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre began recruiting the entertainment aspects of the Holiday Light Show in 2016, so we’re on our second year. It made sense for CST to collaborate with CDA Lake Cruises as The Resort was needing some good talent and we are always looking for ways to keep our pros working locally.

Q: How do Santa, Mrs. Claus and the elves prepare for their roles?
Davis: So. Much. Egg nog.

Q: How are actors chosen?
Davis: Actors are recruited throughout the year. Every person wearing a costume — such as the elves, the Grinch and Santa — is brought in and trained by Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre. The casting requirements: 1) Must love Christmas. 2) Must love children. 3) Must be willing to make believe all night!

Q: Tell us a little about the “behind the scenes” magic that happens!
Davis: We need to be careful not to reveal trade secrets! That said, the number one goal of the journey is to make sure Santa knows who all the kids are who are visiting him! With the billions of kids out there, he needs some administrative assistance to help keep him organized. That’s where the elves come in! Elves surreptitiously greet every family who takes the cruise and make sure all the names of the children are magically delivered to Santa. We utilize all the technology at our disposal to make sure no good child is left off the list!

Are you looking to experience the magic for yourself? Schedule your tickets for the Journey to the North Pole cruises, going on through the end of the month. Contact us today for more information!

A brief history: Steamer ships on Lake Coeur d’Alene

Steam ships play an important role in the rich history of Coeur d’Alene — and Idaho! These ships were used for logging, mining, passenger travel and even mail delivery. The steamer ships of the 1800s and early 1900s eventually gave way to the ships that Coeur d’Alene Cruises uses to take passengers out to see wildlife, holiday lights, and sunsets.
While the list of famous steamer ships on Lake Coeur d’Alene is long and illustrious, here’s a quick peak into our rich history with a few of the most famous ships:

The Amelia Wheaton:
This was one of the first steamboats on the lake, built in 1888. The boat was used to supply Fort Sherman with supplies and transport prospectors to the golf fields after the gold rush. The steamer ran mostly on local wood.

The Georgie Oaks:
This boat was in commission from 1881 to 1920 on Lake Coeur d’Alene and the surrounding water ways. The Georgie Oaks was 150 feet long, 24 feet wide and could carry up to 1,000 passengers.

Seeweewana:
This 65-passenger ship was built for Lake Coeur d’Alene in 1926, and captained by its owner Capt. John Finney. It was 63 feet long, 9 feet wide and started with a gas engine, and was eventually transferred to a diesel engine. The Seeweewana was eventually sunk in the 1980s in front of The Coeur d’Alene Resort’s boardwalk in about 85 feet of water, a common practice to retire boats at the time. It is now a destination for scuba divers who want to see the relic.

The Mish-an-nock:
It has been nearly 50 years since this famous boat first took to the waters of Lake Coeur d’Alene. Named for a word that means “morning star” according to a Kalispell Tribe book, the Mish-an-nock was the first passenger cruise boat on the lake in nearly 30 years. Before that, the last steam passenger boats — the 130-foot Flyer and the 90-foot Clipper — were deemed unsafe and dismantles in 1938. When built, the Mish-an-nock was 65 feet long.

In 1996, the Mish-an-nock was refinished by Fred Finney, who also built cruise boats including The Coeur d’Alene, The Spirit of Coeur d’Alene, The Osprey and Kootenai. The boat is now 107 feet long to accommodate even more passengers.
Which boat in our fleet is your favorite? Join us for a cruise to hear more about the history and to see the beautiful sights of North Idaho!

How did The Resort come to be?

The Coeur d’Alene Resort is one of the most iconic structures in the Northwest. The tower on Lake Coeur d’Alene’s blue waters, surrounded by Idaho’s famous mountains, is a sight that many associate with great memories — cruising on the water, strolling through downtown or watching thousands of Christmas lights come to life.

The Coeur d’Alene Resort has been a staple for downtown Coeur d’Alene for decades. Before becoming the icon it is today, it came from humble roots.

The North Shore Resort opened in the same location in 1965, and the seven-story tower was completed in 1973. Just 10 years later, Hagadone Hospitality took over the structure, improving the structure and dubbing it “The Coeur d’Alene: A Resort on the Lake.”

A newly renovated resort opened in May 1986. It was 18 stories tall, with 338 guest rooms. The building, called the Lake Tower, housed Hagadone Hospitality, which later became the Hagadone Corporation.

When the doors opened in 1986, an article ran in Forbes magazine under the headline: “Duane Hagadone has built himself a fancy resort in the middle of nowhere. Why?”

However, today, it is easy to see how Duane Hagadone’s vision manifested: with towering mountains, lush forests and a glimmering lake, Coeur d’Alene is a destination for tourists, travelers and business people alike. From families riding bikes down the Centennial Trail to convention-goers squeezing in a round of golf on the famous Floating Green, the Coeur d’Alene Resort has attracted all kinds of people. Even locals are known to frequent Dockside Restaurant for a famous Gooey dessert.

The Hagadone Corporation also introduced Coeur d’Alene Cruises, which gives visitors a one-of-a-kind tour of the lake, including everything from wildlife and scenic sails, to the annual Holiday Light Show tour.

Are you ready to schedule your next sail? Give us a call today!

Where to go for a Pirate Ship Cruise?

Avast ye mate, and climb aboard! Do you have yer sea legs yet, mate? You’ll need them, as you join Captain Calico Jack and his crew on an exciting adventure you won’t soon forget!

Set sail on the high seas of Lake Coeur d’Alene, and enjoy 90 minutes packed full of games, fun, and adventure. Great for kids of all ages, and those who are pirates at heart! The ship boards twice daily at Independence Point, and takes sailors on an exciting journey around the lake. Local pirates entertain the sailors with their antiques, search for treasure, and general mayhem. And of course, what would a pirate cruise be without some swashbuckling sword fights?

The All New Carver 34 Fly – Revolutionary

The new Carver 34 Fly is the essence of a Carver Yacht, merging durability and space with modern convenience and efficient design. This exciting new yacht will revolutionize expectations in its class with unmatched ergonomic and spacious layout complemented by forward thinking, design, innovation and styling. The first in an entirely new and exciting series of yachts from Carver, the 34 Fly is handcrafted with pride in the United States. Making its world debut in December 2012, the 34 Fly will raise the bar for yachts in this size class.

The Difference Between Sterndrive and Inboard

For years there have been debates about whether sterndrives or inboards are better. In this post, we’ll present the facts and let you decide on the rest. Both have pros and cons and are two completely different machines.

First of all, let’s start by explaining what exactly sterndrives and inboards are.

A sterndrive is a marine propulsion system that is attached to a sterndrive, also known as an outdrive. The drive unit is both the transmission and propulsion. When the captain turns the steering wheel, the entire drive turns. No rudder is needed.

An inboard is a marine propulsion system that is enclosed within the hull of the boat — it is usually connected to a propulsion screw by a driveshaft. The driveshaft goes from the transmission to a propeller outside of the boat. The boat is steered with a rudder when the steering wheel is turned by the captain. The propeller then pushes the water past the turned rudder and turns the boat.

Hagadone Marine Group launches Harris FloteBote

(Coeur d’Alene, ID) – The newest line of boats to be sold on Lake Coeur d’Alene will be Harris FloteBote pontoons, Hagadone Marine Group has announced.

“You see more and more pontoon boats on the water,” said Craig Brosenne, GM of Hagadone Marine Group. “They are a versatile craft.”

Owners use the dual-hull boats for taking the kids tubing, relaxing on the water, or fishing, Brosenne said. Powered by outboard engines, pontoons are a budget-oriented choice.

Founded in 1957, Harris FloteBote is one of America’s first pontoon boat builders. The boats are built with distinctive styling, innovation, and owner comfort in mind.

“Every Harris Flotebote pontoon is a reflection of our commitment to quality craftsmanship and luxurious recreation on the water,” said Brad Anderson, president of Harris FloteBote. “We’re pleased to add Hagadone Marine Group as one of our premier dealers because of their stellar sales and customer service record.”

Harris FloteBote models are now available for demo at Hagadone Marine Center on Blackwell Island.

“We chose this line because they make great boats, period,” Brosenne said. “I predict these will be hot sellers on Lake Coeur d’Alene.”

Visit hagadonemarine.com or call (208) 664-8274.